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Environmental Policy: Articles

Finding articles

Use the yellow UC-eLinks button to find the online full text if the article isn't automatically available full text in the database.

Databases marked with a blue lock  must be accessed from either on the UC San Diego campus network or via Remote Access.

Put some thought into choosing your search terms and consider synonyms or alternative terms. AND, OR, and NOT can be used to combine or exclude search terms. Check the subject terms listed on your results for additional words to search.

Most databases have help screens that explain how to enter keywords for the best search results.

Take advantage of additional database features where possible, such as citation formatting and limiting to academic journals.

Is it scholarly/peer-reviewed?

A quick checklist:

1. Where did you find the source? Did you use a scholarly database? The Library catalog (Roger)?

2. Who's responsible for the work? Is it published by a university press or another known scholarly publisher?  What are the author's credentials? Is the author a professor or other known academic or scholar?

3. Does it look like a scholarly work? Does it have footnotes and/or endnotes and/or a bibliography? What kinds of sources it it citing? Where did the author get their information? What research methodology are they using?

4. You can also use the Ulrichsweb database to confirm if a journal is peer-reviewed. An open book icon next to a journal title indicates "refereed" or peer-reviewed.

Key Research Tools for Finding Articles

Scholarly articles are written by academics who are experts in their field and published in scholarly journals. Peer-reviewed articles are scholarly articles that have been read and vetted by other experts in the field (e.g., the author's peers) before the journal accepts them for publication.

Find citations to scholarly articles in Political Science and other Social Sciences searching by keyword in the following databases. 

Search tip: Use the yellow UC-eLinks button to link to the online full text (if available), find the print version of the publication (by searching the Roger library catalog) or order a copy from another library (when not available from the UC San Diego Library).

News sources can be particularly useful as primary sources that describe events as they unfold. They may cover sitautions or events that are newer or more specific than than one might find in scholarly articles. The Library subscribe to a number of online sources for international news.

Google Scholar

Bonus search tip: Google Scholar is a useful tool because it searches within the full text of articles. It's most useful when your topic is so narrow that you don't find much using the subject-specific databases.

Google Scholar Search

Melvyl

Search Tip: Melvyl now also includes citations to articles from many (but definitely not all) of UC San Diego's article databases. 

Search for an item in libraries near you:
WorldCat.org >>